10x Genomics Blog

  • One protein tips the scales of tolerance and resistance in the immune response to influenza infection

    Olivia Habern on May 12, 2021

    An enzyme responsible for deconstructing extracellular matrix proteins in remodeling lung tissue has been identified as a driver of influenza infection severity. Explore the unexpected role of ADAMTS4, how it changes T-cell behavior in infected tissue, suggests novel implications for treating respiratory viral infection, and more, in this blog. Plus, review the full study with our on-demand webinar from primary investigator, Dr. Paul Thomas of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

    Crystal structure of ADAMTS4. Rendered from PDB 2RJP. CREDIT: Mattyjenjen
    Crystal structure of ADAMTS4. Rendered from PDB 2RJP. CREDIT: Mattyjenjen
  • All in one: Deciphering the COVID-19 immune response at the single cell level with Multiomic Cytometry

    Jeanene Swanson on May 11, 2021
    Scientists continue to investigate how SARS-CoV-2 infection affects immune cells circulating in the peripheral blood. Here, a viral cell is surrounded by blood cells.
    Scientists continue to investigate how SARS-CoV-2 infection affects immune cells circulating in the peripheral blood. Here, a viral cell is surrounded by blood cells.

    While scientists have made strides in learning about the pathogenesis of COVID-19, they are still unclear as to precisely what molecular and other factors contribute to the severity of infection. One key piece to solving this puzzle is the peripheral blood. Previous studies show a complex network of immune response in the peripheral blood after infection by SARS-CoV-2, which can be mined for clues. To better understand this complicated, but coordinated, immune response—especially as it pertains to mild versus severe disease—scientists are turning to the increased resolution of single cell analyses.

  • When spatial gene expression meets FFPE tissue blocks: A modern-day love story

    Leidamarie Tirado-Lee on May 5, 2021

    Though FFPE processing has revolutionized life science research, it damages RNA molecules, complicating transcriptomic-level investigations. Imagine bringing the comprehensive insights of spatially resolved transcriptomics to biobanked samples. Read this blog post to learn about the power of our newest offering, Visium Spatial Gene Expression for FFPE.

    Figure 1. Histopathology slides and FFPE tissue blocks. Credit: MaXPdia, Getty Images.
    Figure 1. Histopathology slides and FFPE tissue blocks. Credit: MaXPdia, Getty Images.
  • Automating single cell workflows: Learn how Roche and Pfizer are using Chromium Connect to optimize drug development

    Jeanene Swanson on May 3, 2021

    10x Genomics Chromium Connect, an automated platform for single cell gene expression and single cell immune profiling, can increase your laboratory’s efficiency and productivity by shortening hands-on time from more than eight hours to less than one hour. In this post, we feature two pharmaceutical companies, Roche Innovation Center Zurich (RICZ) and Pfizer, that are implementing Chromium Connect automation to advance novel targets through their drug pipelines.

  • Exploring the origins of neuropsychiatric dysfunction: A look back at the Global Psychiatric Disorders Virtual Symposium

    Liz Lucero on April 29, 2021

    At our recent Global Psychiatric Disorders Virtual Symposium, we heard from leading neuroscientists using cutting-edge single cell and spatial technologies to build a deeper understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying psychiatric disorders. 

    This High Angular Resolution Diffusion Image (HARDI) of the human brain shows long distance connections, or tracts, grouped on the basis of their anatomical neighborhood. Wiring associated with particular brain structures share the same color. CREDIT: Viviana Siless, PhD, Anastasia Yendiki, PhD, MGH/Harvard, Boston Adolescent Neuroimaging of Depression and Anxiety (BANDA)
    This High Angular Resolution Diffusion Image (HARDI) of the human brain shows long distance connections, or tracts, grouped on the basis of their anatomical neighborhood. Wiring associated with particular brain structures share the same color. CREDIT: Viviana Siless, PhD, Anastasia Yendiki, PhD, MGH/Harvard, Boston Adolescent Neuroimaging of Depression and Anxiety (BANDA)
  • New resources for enhancing your single cell oncology research

    Andreah Wallace on April 22, 2021

    Explore the latest discoveries in cancer biology at our upcoming Global Virtual Cancer Symposium and find valuable resources for your own research. Download our new guide for getting started with single cell applications to see how each step in your experimental workflow plays a part in generating high-quality data and discovering novel biological insights.

    Immunofluorescent staining of Merkel cell carcinoma tumor tissue illustrating expression of CD200 (green) on the surface of tumor cells. CD200 plays a role in immunosuppression. The endothelial marker CD31 (red) highlights blood vessels. Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare and aggressive skin cancer. CREDIT: Isaac Brownell, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases/NIH
    Immunofluorescent staining of Merkel cell carcinoma tumor tissue illustrating expression of CD200 (green) on the surface of tumor cells. CD200 plays a role in immunosuppression. The endothelial marker CD31 (red) highlights blood vessels. Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare and aggressive skin cancer. CREDIT: Isaac Brownell, National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases/NIH
  • Advancing neuroscience with multidimensional investigations

    Liz Lucero on April 19, 2021

    Neuroscience research, especially in areas like neurodegenerative disease, psychiatric disorders, and neural development and differentiation, has been hampered by the inability to build complete pictures and detailed views of complex single cell biology. With multi-assay experiments, researchers can combine technologies to examine the central nervous system from many angles, opening up new and previously inaccessible opportunities for future study.  

    To support neuroscientists taking a multipronged approach, in February, we launched the Neuroscience Scientific Challenge, giving researchers the chance to win a complete multi-assay experiment, including reagents, sequencing, and service, performed by 10x Genomics partner lab, Applied Genomics, Computation & Translational Core (AGCT). We asked researchers from around the globe to submit their proposals for an experiment using a combination of 10x Genomics single cell and spatial technologies, and the response was incredible. We were thrilled to see how many of you are out there working to deepen our understanding of neuroscience with multidimensional views of the brain and nervous system. 

  • Novel cell types implicated in COVID-19 cytokine storm: Findings from the Single Cell Consortium for COVID-19 in China

    Olivia Habern on April 16, 2021

    Researchers from 39 institutes and hospitals across China have come together to deeply profile the immune response to SARS-CoV-2 infection. A testament to the potential of scientific collaboration in enabling large-cohort studies, they collectively performed single cell RNA-sequencing on 284 samples from 196 COVID-19 patients and controls, totaling 1.46 million cells. 

    Explore their findings regarding the influence of population demographics on the immune landscape, surprising evidence of immune cell susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection, and new cellular culprits of the cytokine storm. Plus, find out how 10x Genomics scientists played a part in enabling the success of this team effort, from connecting labs in the midst of a global pandemic to providing guidance and reagents.

  • Mapping the second brain: Single cell characterization of the enteric nervous system reveals clues to IBD

    Jeanene Swanson on April 15, 2021

    April is Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Awareness Month, and chances are you know someone who struggles with this common disorder. Though it’s estimated that 10–15% of the population has IBS—or between 25 and 45 million people in the United States—it is commonly undiagnosed (1). Worse, the exact cause of IBS remains unknown, and while treatments do exist, they may not completely address symptoms.

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which is diagnosed by the presence of inflammation in the gut, is an umbrella term that encompasses Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and other syndromes, like IBS. Because IBD and IBS are believed to involve the gut–brain axis, and this enteric nervous system has not yet been well characterized, single cell tools will help enable a deeper understanding of both the heterogeneity of this “second brain” and its complexity, or, how these cells interact with surrounding endothelial, stromal, and immune cells. In this post, we take a look at one research paper that uses single cell sequencing to build an atlas of the human and mouse colon in an effort to understand the disease mechanism behind IBD—and how this knowledge might inform the development of improved therapies.